Legacies of Hope

The Legacy of Hope Society recognizes special friends, like the individuals profiled here, who have joined their legacy with City of Hope’s by leaving a gift for City of Hope in their will or trust or by beneficiary designation. The Legacy of Hope Society is a way for us to recognize this profound contribution to City of Hope’s future.

If you have left a gift for City of Hope, we hope you will let us know. Notifying us is the best way to ensure we receive the gift you intend for us and that your wishes for the use of your gift are honored at the time your gift is received. We would also like to welcome you into our Legacy of Hope Society and, with your permission, provide appropriate recognition for your generosity.

A Passion for Cancer Prevention and for City of Hope
Leslie Bernstein, Ph.D., never imagined that she would have a distinguished career as a cancer prevention researcher. Upon graduation from high school at age 16, she was offered the opportunity to study biostatistics and prepare for a Ph.D. program then being launched at UCLA. Her career trajectory was delayed when, at age 18, she married her husband, Saul, and moved with him to San Francisco, where he began medical school at the University of California and she gave up her career to become a mother.
Compassion Stands Out
Bob Enk credits his father for giving him his start in business products and it is in his father’s memory that Bob has stepped forward to lead the City of Hope Industry Challenge on behalf of the National Business Products Industry.
Giving Is Part of Living
Giving has been a part of Nancy Jo Flint’s life since she was a teenager. Instead of throwing Nancy Jo a 12th birthday party, her mother took her to California Hospital in Los Angeles, launching six years of Saturdays as a “candy striper” during which Nancy Jo donated her time and compassion to people in need.
Giving to and for the Next Generation
“I know how hard it is to get funding,” Carlotta Glackin, Ph.D., says. “I have spent most of my career in the lab at City of Hope working with superb graduate students. Having been a patient, too, I want to focus on the next generation and ensure that City of Hope continues to be a research and treatment leader. My gift through my estate to fund scholarships for graduate students will help ensure what I’ve achieved will live on.”
Paying It Forward
Like many who come to us for help, Jeff Gryde owes his life to clinical research and the generous donors who support it. That’s the reason he has included City of Hope in his estate plan and agreed to be public about his commitment.
Progress in the Way Patients are Treated
“National Professional Salon Industry support of City of Hope is a 30-year tradition. I’m proud to be part of an industry that has given so much to so many,” says Harlan Kirschner, explaining why he participates in the Industry Challenge to benefit City of Hope.
Giving Back to the Community
Bruce Merino is a native Californian, but for many years he was bicoastal, commuting between his home on the West Coast and his job as an executive with The Home Depot in Atlanta. His career in the hardware industry started after college, working for Handyman of California. Bruce joined The Home Depot in 1984, when the company had only 16 stores nationwide. By the time he retired in 2009 as president of the Western Division, he was leading 440 stores and 70,000 associates across nine states.
Giving and Being of Service
To feel “glad of our shadow,” of what we’ve accomplished in this world, is the guiding principle of Rosalinda O’Neill’s life. Caring for others, giving and being of service without seeking recognition are life lessons she learned from her grandmother, mother and teachers. It’s probably not surprising, then, that four of the five children in her family went into caring professions like Rosalinda, a licensed psychotherapist and successful life building consultant.
A Lifelong Crusade
In 1990, Pat Perrott was confronted by the sudden and unexpected threat of cancer when her eldest son, Matthew Phelan, was diagnosed with lymphoma. However, this parent’s worst nightmare became the seed of an incredible, lifelong crusade for a mother determined to share with others the hope and healing that her family discovered at City of Hope.
Creating Tomorrow’s Miracles
“We were taught that you give what you can and we want to send that same message to our children,” shares Sam Richardson, National Business Products Industry supporter and Industry Challenge leader. “That’s why we’ve left a gift of life insurance to City of Hope. It’s an easy way to provide for our daughters and leave a legacy of hope that will help future families.”
If We Don’t Do It, Who Will?
Dick Spezzano and his wife, Carole, consider themselves doubly lucky. They have not been personally touched by cancer and they have had the good fortune to be touched deeply by their involvement with City of Hope. “It’s easy to appreciate what City of Hope does,” says Dick. “You see the results in lives saved.”
Twin Loves Bind Couple to Each Other and to City of Hope
Now that they are retired, Roberta (“Birdie”) and Bob Feldman are looking for ways to simplify their life and spend more time on the water. They decided to demonstrate their support for the lifesaving research and care City of Hope provides by making a gift of real estate: an apartment building they bought as an investment years ago.
A Legacy Well Worth Leaving
"Judy and I know we could never repay the City of Hope staff for saving our lives on two separate occasions each, but we have decided to revise our living trust so that some of our resources will be used by City of Hope to treat others who are facing catastrophic disease." shares Duane Preimsberger. "That’s a legacy we believe is well worth leaving and we are delighted to do that as a token for the faith, hope and love we have for this truly remarkable place!"
Couple United in Work, in Play and in Giving
“As we thought about the legacy we want to leave, we started looking for a group that will use our money wisely,” says Debbra Jacobs-Robinson. “We couldn’t find a better mission than disease research and helping people who are ill.” Debbra and her husband Dave decided to create a charitable gift annuity to benefit City of Hope.
A Gift to Save Other Lives
“Dr. Fong and City of Hope saved my life,” Janet Rose attests. That is why Janet decided to include a gift of retirement plan assets to the City of Hope in her will. “I felt that if they saved my life, they could save other lives too. What better way to support their important work and help others?”
Helping Others Through Science and Giving
Christine Rotgers doesn’t consider herself a trailblazer. But she is. Her mother was a homemaker and her father a sawyer whose education peaked before high school. And three of her grandparents were illiterate. Christine, however, attended college and earned a bachelor’s degree in bacteriology. After college, she followed one of her colleagues to the Los Angeles area.
Living Life to the Fullest
Sylvia Silverberg is a role model for how to stay vital as you age. At age 83, she regularly presents humor programs for clubs near her home in Florida. She also plays the leading role in making decisions about her finances.