Giving Is Part of Living

Giving has been a part of Nancy Jo Flint’s life since she was a teenager. Instead of throwing Nancy Jo a 12th birthday party, her mother took her to California Hospital in Los Angeles, launching six years of Saturdays as a “candy striper” during which Nancy Jo donated her time and compassion to people in need. Her mother had grown up in an environment that did not give her the opportunity to volunteer. She encouraged her daughter’s volunteerism as a way to give Nancy Jo something she never got to experience as a child.

Even as she rose through the ranks at Hughes Aircraft Company and, later, retired from Raytheon Corporation, Nancy Jo found time to expand her definition of giving. She has made significant financial gifts to City of Hope and other nonprofits, as well as tribute and memorial gifts, and she provides direct financial assistance to individuals in need. In addition to continuing her volunteer work she has also served as a patient advocate. “Giving is part of living,” Nancy Jo says. “It’s as important to me as family, friends, religion and career.” Although she considers it deeply personal and private, she agreed to share her story as a way of encouraging others to give, too.

Nancy Jo’s father was an early patient at City of Hope, living in a bungalow on campus while being treated for valley fever. “Every Sunday we’d visit my dad. It was actually a fun experience because the staff treated us like family,” she recalls. “That’s where my passion for City of Hope began — though it would be 30 years later, while I raised my son and built my career, before I was in a position to help City of Hope in any meaningful financial way.”

One of her gifts — to her parents and to City of Hope — was funding a plaque and memorial bricks in the Rose Garden in honor of her parents, grandparents, and aunt and uncle. The plaque and bricks were unveiled at an 80th birthday party for her father. “We met at the fountain and walked over to see the plaque and bricks,” Nancy Jo says. “My parents were pleased at the plaque in their honor — but what meant the most to them was the recognition not only of them, but also of other close family members, who had passed on.”

Nancy Jo’s philosophy of giving inspired her to do more. She volunteered twice a week at the information desk after her retirement. She also refers friends and family to City of Hope. “I think it’s important for those close to me to go to City of Hope prior to making decisions about their diagnosis and treatment,” she says. “No matter the outcome, I know they will be treated with compassion and the very best of care, by the City of Hope staff.”

Nancy Jo has also included a gift for City of Hope in her trust and will. “Giving is a legacy that continues from generation to generation and one that provides satisfaction you can’t get anywhere else,” she says. “I consider my contributions, financial and personal, to City of Hope to be among the most important accomplishments of my life.”

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